Wickes Full CV

DAVID J. WICKES, M.A., D.C.

514 NW 24th Circle

Camas, WA  98607

dwickes@mac.com

503-341-2570

CORE COMPETENCIES

•  Institutional leadership •  Educational technology •  Accreditation
•  Strategic planning •  Distance learning •  Project and team management
•  Assessment •  Curriculum design •  Grants and fundraising

EDUCATION AND CREDENTIALS

  • Doctor of Chiropractic (D.C.)
    National College of Chiropractic, 1977
  • Family Practice residency
    National College of Chiropractic, 1977-79
  • Institute for Educational Management (IEM)
    Harvard University Graduate School of Education, 1997
  • Certificate in Fundraising Management (CFRM)
    Indiana University Center on Philanthropy, 2007
  • Master of Arts in Education and Human Development (M.A.)
    (concentration: Educational Technology Leadership)
    George Washington University, 2009
  • Certificate – Quality Matters Peer Reviewer
    Quality Matters Program (quality assurance in online education), 2010
  • Other: Bachelor of Science (B.S.); Associate of Arts (A.A.)

SUMMARY OF PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

Consultant      (ongoing)

  • Consulting services in educational technology, distance learning, accreditation, academic program development, and institutional management

University of Western States, Portland, Oregon      (7/2004 - 7/2011)

  • Executive Vice President and Provost

National University of Health Sciences, Lombard, Illinois      (1979 - 2004)

  • Senior Vice President and Provost (1999-2004)
  • Vice President for Academic Affairs (1996-1999)
  • Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs (1995-1996)
  • Dean of Clinics / Chief of Clinics Staff (1991-1995)
  • Director, Training and Assessment Center (1990-1995)
  • Chairman, Department of Diagnosis and Director Student Clinic (1980-1991)
  • Director, Patient and Research Center; Inpatient Facility (1984-1985)
  • Faculty, Department of Diagnosis (1979-2003)
  • Lecturer, Lincoln College of Post-professional, Graduate and Continuing Education (1979-2003)

ADMINISTRATIVE AND EDUCATIONAL CAREER HIGHLIGHTS

University of Western States – Portland, Oregon                                              7/2004-7/2011

A private, non-profit university with approximately 475 students, 45 full-time and 51 part-time faculty, 100 staff, four clinics, and a $16 million budget.  Doctor of chiropractic, master of science in exercise and sports science, master of science in nutrition and functional medicine, bachelor of science in human biology degree and therapeutic massage programs. UWS emphasizes evidence-based practice and primary care.  Formerly the Western States College of Chiropractic.

Executive Vice President and Provost (2004-2011)

Responsible for institutional planning, assessment, accreditation, development, research, new program development, information technology, continuing and distance education, undergraduate education, learning resources, marketing and communications, and union negotiations.   Coordination with executive team – vice president of academic affairs, vice president of financial affairs, vice president of clinics and vice president of enrollment management.  Significant achievements include:

  • Organization and leadership of regional and programmatic accreditation self-studies.
  • Development of new MS degree program in exercise and sports science, new MS degree program in nutrition and functional medicine, and new certificate program in therapeutic massage.
  • Coordination of successful substantive change processes with regional accrediting agency (NWCCU) for a new degree level (master’s degree), new master’s degrees, online delivery of a degree program, and a new certificate program.
  • Development of distance learning strategy and guidelines, initiation of online courses for academic degree and continuing education programs, and design of a faculty development program in blended and distance learning.
  • Chief administrative negotiator for faculty union contract. Led successful efforts to modernize the contract, implement a faculty performance evaluation system, implement interest-based bargaining, and implement multi-year contracts to improve budget process.
  • Advisor for NIH grant: Evidence-Based Care: Faculty and Curriculum Development. (funded 7/05-6/09; renewed for 7/09-6/12).
  • Initiation of a formal development operation at the university, including building of infrastructure for fundraising, establishment of annual fund, initiation of planned giving.
  • Successful authoring and funding of several major foundation grants.
  • Oversight of restructuring of IT department and development of IT strategic plan to rebuild network infrastructure, implement learning technologies, and modernize academic and business IT operations.  Coordinated with CIO the replacement of all core network equipment, replacement of all campus network cabling, selection and implementation of a new academic information system (PowerCampus), implementation of a lecture capture system (Tegrity) in all classrooms, implementation of a learning management system (Moodle), and development of a business continuity plan.
  • Coordination of academic team needs assessment for new anatomical sciences building.
  • Coordination of team for the university transition and branding in 2009-10.
  • Served as interim CFO on two occasions.  Responsible for budget development and presentation to Board, produced trend analysis of financial indicators/ratios, oversight of institutional audit process.
  • Development of infrastructure for new institutional effectiveness department and operation.
  • Negotiation of an articulation agreement and facilities leasing agreement at a community college to enable UWS to deliver academic programs and clinical services at that campus.

National University of Health Sciences – Lombard, Illinois                                1979-2004

A private, non-profit university with 400-950 students, 60-90 full and part-time faculty, 100-150 staff, 4-7 clinics, and a $14-22 million budget (ranges covering 25 years).  Doctor of Chiropractic and Bachelor of Science in Human Biology degree programs, certificate program in Therapeutic Massage, and recently implemented programs in Acupuncture and Naturopathic Medicine.

Senior Vice President and Provost (1999-2004)

Chief Operations Officer and Chief Academic Officer responsible for daily operations of the institution.  Direct reports: Vice President for Academic Affairs and Vice President for Business Affairs.  Managed a budget as high as $22.5 million.  Significant achievements included:

  • Appointed as senior VP to deal with an emerging financial crisis. Developed an administrative team that dealt with a projected institutional $2.3 million deficit (1999), successfully reversing the adverse financial trend and restoring a positive variance within eighteen months.
  • Assumed responsibility for office of development, resulting in a streamlining of fundraising operations, several large gifts, and planned giving programs.  Annual net fundraising efforts approximated $400,000, with additional major gifts ($200,000+) and pledged planned gifts ($1M+).
  • Coordinated three major accreditation self-studies (regional, focused, and programmatic).
  • Implemented the first formal long-range institutional planning process, converting a prior accreditation concern into a commendation.
  • Revised the chiropractic degree curriculum into integrated learning modules.
  • Modernized faculty and student computing resources, including the development of a 40-workstation computer lab and implementation of a learning management system.
  • Assisted the Universidade Anhembi Morumbi in the development of a chiropractic degree program in Sao Paulo, Brazil; first class graduated in 2004.
  • Worked with president to transition institution from single-purpose college into university structure in 2000.
  • Selected by Board of Trustees to assume the presidency upon the retirement of the current President; transition cancelled when the President opted not to retire.

Vice President for Academic Affairs (1996-1999)>

Direct supervision of all deans (student affairs, research, assessment, academic, postgraduate, clinic and allied health sciences).  Significant achievements included:                     

  • Completed restructuring of Research Department and institutional research board.
  • Implemented exit clinical competency exams for interns.
  • Implemented WebCT learning system, allowing development of web-based distance learning and computer-assisted campus course support.
  • Developed collaborative clinical program with the Aids Alternative Health Project.
  • Opened new community public clinic for intern training.
  • Implemented community-based internships and preceptorships.
  • Planned and implemented a program in therapeutic massage.
  • Developed professional doctoral program in naturopathic medicine and a master’s degree program in acupuncture (programs were deferred due to financial limitations in 1999; university launched these programs in 2005). 

Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs (1995-1996)

Developmental position, providing administrative professional development under the mentorship of an experienced campus administrator. Significant achievements included:

  • Completed intensive three-week program at Harvard’s Institute for Educational Management designed for senior administrators to examine senior leadership, contexts of leadership, the changing industry of higher education, and mobilizing for change.
  • Revised the faculty handbook and faculty evaluation process.
  • Co-chaired Curriculum Committee to implement a problem-based learning curriculum, the most significant change in chiropractic education in several decades.

Dean of Clinics / Chief of Clinics Staff (1991-1995)

Responsible for all clinical programs and operations, including several public clinics and two clinics at Salvation Army adult rehabilitation centers; clinic system recorded an average of 65,000 patient visits per year.  Significant achievements included:

  • Negotiated clinical affiliation agreements and initiated hospital rotations for interns.
  • Initiated a formal preceptorship program for interns.
  • Designed and implemented a faculty practice program.
  • Opened a new public clinic.
  • Developed an MRI center at the main campus clinic, providing advanced imaging capabilities for patient care and clinical research..

Director of the Training and Assessment Center (1990-1995)

Responsible for developing and operating a 14-room training and assessment center used for small group instruction, standardized patient interactions, and formal multiple-station objective structured clinical examinations with extensive audiovisual monitoring equipment, the first such facility in chiropractic education and one of the largest in healthcare education today.  Significant achievements included:

  • Conceived, designed and implemented the training and assessment center. Had 10 patient-encounter rooms, each with adjacent observation rooms and one-way mirrors, intercoms, and two CCD cameras. A large control room had monitors and recording equipment for each room, camera switches, and a paging system. Computers in each room allowed for student input during competency exams.
  • Coordinated an affiliate agreement to use “sensitive exam” (i.e., gynecologic, proctologic) teaching assistants providing training services at regional medical schools.
  • Developed a computer simulation authoring software system (“CaseCreator”) allowing faculty to author computer-based patient simulations.

Chairman, Department of Diagnosis and Director, Student Clinic (1980-1991)

Responsible for instruction and clinical training of students and specialty residents in routine and specialty diagnostic procedures and the management of non-musculoskeletal disorders, as well as the healthcare needs of campus students and families; averaged 8400 patient visits per year. Significant achievements included:

  • Created and implemented a student health service to train third and fourth year students in clinic procedures before entering the public outpatient clinic program.
  • Coordinated training of departmental faculty in problem-based learning methods, allowing for the gradual introduction of these methods into the curriculum.
  • Performed and taught specialty diagnostic procedures, including electrocardiography, peripheral vascular evaluations, sigmoidoscopy, audiometry, pulmonary function testing, laryngoscopy and pelvic exams.
  • Specialty practice in diagnosis and management of chronic diseases, incorporating chiropractic, nutrition, functional medicine, botanical medicine and acupuncture.

Director, Patient and Research Center; Inpatient Facility (1984-1985)

Supervised attending chiropractic and medical physicians, residents, nurses and interns in a unique 48-bed facility designed for the 24-hour observation, evaluation and management of difficult and unusual chiropractic patients.

TEACHING EXPERIENCE

  • Faculty (full-time).  National University of Health Sciences.  Provided classroom, laboratory and clinical instruction to students enrolled in the doctor of chiropractic degree program.  Courses:  physical diagnosis, laboratory diagnosis, clinical problem solving, diagnosis of cardiovascular and respiratory disorders.  From 1979-1991, averaged 15 contact hours per week.  From 1991 to 2003, approximately 3-5 contact hours per week as duties shifted from faculty to administration.
  • Lecturer, Lincoln College of Post-professional, Graduate and Continuing Education; National University of Health Sciences.  Provided continuing chiropractic education courses, 10-12 hours long over a two-day period.  Averaged 8 to 10 lectures per year from 1980 to 2000, and about 3 per year after 2000.  Topics included: clinical laboratory diagnosis, peripheral vascular disorders, electrocardiography, differential diagnosis, diagnosis and management of chronic diseases, and cardiovascular disorders.
  • Visiting faculty, Institute for Functional Medicine, Gig Harbor, Washington  (1998-2001; 2004).  The IFM is a non-profit organization specializing in multidisciplinary continuing education programs.

CONTINUING EDUCATION RELEVANT TO EDUCATION, ACCREDITATION, FUNDRAISING AND ADMINISTRATION

  • Annual attendance at the Research Agenda Conference (RAC) and Association of Chiropractic Colleges Educational Conference, 1996 to 2011.  Various locations.
  • Annual attendance at the Annual Meetings of the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities, 2005 to 2011.  Seattle, WA.
  • Association of Specialized and Professional Accreditors annual meeting.  Chicago, IL.  April 3-5, 2011. 
  • 48th International Conference on Fundraising.  Association of Fundraising Professionals.  Chicago, IL.  March 24-28, 2011.
  • Year One/Year Three Self-Evaluation Workshop.  Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities.  Seattle, WA:  March 2, 2011.
  • Sloan-C International Conference on Online Learning - The Power of Online Learning: Stimulating New Possibilities.  Orlando, FL.  November 3-5, 2010.
  • Applying the QM Rubric.  Quality Matters Program (QA in online education).  May 4, 2010.
  • Association of Specialized and Professional Accreditors annual meeting.  Chicago, IL.  March 28-30, 2011. 
  • Comprehensive (All Standards) Report and Visit Workshop.  Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities.  Seattle, WA:  February 19, 2010.
  • Year One Report Workshop.  Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities.  Seattle, WA:  February 17, 2010.
  • Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) annual conference.  Washington, D.C.  January 25-28, 2010.
  • Sloan-C Conference on Online Learning.  Orlando, FL.  October 28-30, 2009.
  • Negotiating Labor Agreements. Executive Education Series - Program on Negotiation. MIT, University of Illinois and Harvard Law School. Chicago, IL; October 1-2, 2009.
  • 46th International Conference on Fundraising.  Association of Fundraising Professionals.  New Orleans, LA.  March 29-April 1, 2009.
  • Chiropractic Education in an Era of Digital Natives and Digital Immigrants.  WFC/ACC Education Conference 2008. Beijing, China.  November 10-11, 2008.
  • Academic Medical and Health Science Centers Conference.  Tradeline, Inc.  San Francisco.  October 15-18, 2008.
  • Advanced Grant Strategies.  TACS.  Portland, OR.  October 9, 2008.
  • Foundation and Corporate Grant Strategies.  TACS. Portland, OR.  August 20-21, 2008.
  • 5th Annual EduComm Conference. Las Vegas, NV.  June 18-20, 2008.
  • Performance Assessment in Higher Education.  Harvard Graduate School of Education.  Cambridge, MA:  November 8-10, 2007.
  • American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC) Annual Meeting.  Washington, DC.  November 4-7, 2007.
  • Evaluator Training Workshop.  Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities.  Seattle, WA:  November 2, 2007.
  • Developing Annual Sustainability. Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University.  Indianapolis, IN:  October 23-24, 2007.
  • Developing Major Gifts. Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University.  Winter Park, FL:  October 17-19, 2007.
  • Planned Giving. Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University.  Indianapolis, IN:  September 24-26, 2007.
  • Interpersonal Skills for Fundraising. Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University.  Indianapolis, IN:  September 11-12, 2007.
  • Academy of Site Team Visitors Workshop.  Council on Chiropractic Education.  Scottsdale, AZ;  May 18-19, 2007.
  • Principles & Techniques of Fundraising. Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University.  Seattle, WA;  April 23-27, 2007.
  • Negotiating Labor Agreements. Executive Education Series - Program on Negotiation.  Harvard Law School. Cambridge, MA; April 12-13, 2007.
  • 44th International Conference on Fundraising.  Association of Fundraising Professionals.  Dallas, TX.  March 24-28, 2007.
  • World Federation of Chiropractic (WFC) international symposium on "Curriculum Development in Chiropractic Education".  Sao Paulo, Brazil.  October 26-29, 2002.
  • WFC Conference on the Internationalization of Chiropractic Education. World Federation of Chiropractic, Manila, Philippines. September 29-October 1, 1998.
  • 19th Annual National Conference on Law and Higher Education Stetson University College of Law. Clearwater Beach, Florida. February 12-14, 1998.
  • 21st Century Higher Education Conference: Beyond the Millennium. KPMG Peat Marwick. Palm Beach, FL; December 7-9,1997.
  • 18th Annual National Conference on Law and Higher Education. Stetson University College of Law. Clearwater Beach, Florida. February 13-15, 1997.
  • Institute for Educational Management (IEM). Harvard University Graduate School of Education. July 5-25, 1997.  
  • 21st Century Higher Education Conference: 10th Annual Conference. KPMG Peat Marwick. Palm Beach, FL; December 15-17, 1996.
  • 21st Century Higher Education Conference: Positioning Your Institution to Be a Market Leader.   KPMG Peat Marwick. Palm Beach, FL; December 4-5, 1995.
  • Strategies for Integrating Clinical and Basic Sciences.  Second Biennial Conference of the Basic Science Education Forum.  Rush Medical College. June 24-27, 1995.
  • The New Medical Staff. Legal Issues Update. National Health Lawyers Association. Chicago, September, 1991.
  • Tutorial Skills in Problem-Based Learning. Southern Illinois University Medical School. Springfield, IL. June 1990.
  • Designing and Implementing Faculty Development Programs. Michigan Colleges' Consortium for Faculty Development. Levonia, MI. March 1990.
  • Performance-Based Assessment of Clinical Competence. Southern Illinois University Medical School. Springfield, IL.  March 1990.
  • Problem-Based Learning, Part II - Development of Problems and Curriculum Design.  Southern Illinois University Medical School. Monterey, CA.  April 1990.
  • Problem-Based Learning and the Assessment of Problem Solving Skills.Southern Illinois University Medical School. Monterey, CA. April 1989.
  • Third National Conference on Assessment in Higher Education - Workshop on Assessment of Critical Thinking.  American Association for Higher Education. Chicago, IL. June 1988.
  • Improving Your Teaching Skills. Harvard Medical School. Boston, MA. November 1987.
  • Systematic Course Design.  Harvard Medical School. Boston, MA. November 1986.

CONTINUING EDUCATION RELEVANT TO CLINICAL PRACTICE

  • The Challenge of Emerging Infections in the 21st Century: Terrain, Tolerance, and Susceptibility. 2011 International Symposium on Functional Medicine.  Bellevue, WA.  April 28-30, 2011.
  • Advanced Diagnosis and Nutrition in Practice – the Diagnosis and Management of Complex Clinical Syndromes.  ACA Council on Diagnosis and Internal Disorders.  Nashville, TN.  July 16-18, 2010.
  • Confronting Cancer as a Chronic Disease: Primary Care Takes a 360-degree View. 17th International Symposium on Functional Medicine.  Hollywood, FL.  May 20-23, 2010.
  • Advanced Diagnosis and Nutrition in Practice.  Council on Diagnosis and Internal Disorders.  Dallas, TX.  July 17-18, 2009.
  • Assessment and Treatment of Mood Disorders from a Functional Medicine Perspective. 16th International Symposium on Functional Medicine.  Hollywood, FL.  May 27-30, 2009.
  • WHO Congress and Symposium on Manual Therapies.  World Health Organization.  Beijing, China.  November 7-9, 2008.
  • The Many Faces of Pain: Functional Models for Assessment and Treatment.  15th International Symposium on Functional Medicine. Carlsbad, CA.  May 22-25, 2008.
  • Council on Diagnosis and Internal Disorders Symposium.  Las Vegas, NV.  July 19-21, 2007.
  • 21st Century Endocrinology: Thyroid and Adrenal Sentinel Organs.  14th International Symposium on Functional Medicine. Tucson, AZ.  April 23-26, 2007.
  • Managing Biotransformation: The Metabolic, Genomic, and Detoxification Balance Points.  13th International Symposium on Functional Medicine. Tampa, FL.  April 20-22, 2006.
  • Council on Diagnosis and Internal Disorders Symposium.  Minneapolis, MN.  July 14-17, 2005.
  • The Immune System under Siege. 12th International Symposium on Functional Medicine. Palm Springs, CA.  May 26-28, 2005.
  • Applying Functional Medicine in Clinical Practice. Institute for Functional Medicine, Danvers, MA. October 13-18, 2003.
  • The Heart on Fire: Modifiable Factors Beyond Cholesterol. Tenth International Symposium on Functional Medicine. Palm Springs, CA.  May 24-28, 2003.
  • Disorders of the Brain: Emerging Therapies in Complex Neurologic and Psychiatric Conditions. 9th International Symposium on Functional Medicine. Tucson, AZ. May 27-29, 2002.
  • Conference on Primary Care.  American Association of Chiropractic Physicians.  Chicago, IL. May 17-18, 2002.
  • Annual symposium of the American Association of Naturopathic Physicians.  Tucson, AZ.  August 22-23, 2001.
  • Annual symposium of the ACA Council on Family Practice.  Denver, CO.  July 19-22, 2001.
  • Disorders of Intracellular Mediators & Messengers. 6th International Symposium on Functional Medicine. Tucson, AZ. May 23-26, 1999.
  • Applying Functional Medicine in Clinical Practice. Institute for Functional Medicine, Gig Harbor, Washington. September 18-21 and November 1-2, 1998.
  • Functional Medicine Applications to Disorders of Gene Expression. 5th International Symposium on Functional Medicine. Mauna Lani, Hawaii. May 3-6, 1998.
  • American Association of Naturopathic Physicians 1998 Spring Convention. Boston, MA.  April 3-5, 1998.
  • Functional Modulation of Diseases Throughout the Life Cycle. 4th International Symposium on Functional Medicine. Aspen, Colorado. March 27-31, 1997.
  • International Conference on Spinal Manipulation. Bournemouth, England. October 17-19, 1996.
  • Integrating Alternative Medicine and Managed Care.   The National Managed Health Care Congress. San Francisco, CA. September 9-10, 1996.
  • American Association of Naturopathic Physicians Annual Convention. Seattle, WA. September 4-8, 1996.
  • The Second Annual International Congress on Alternative & Complementary Medicine. Arlington, VA. June 10-12, 1996.
  • The 3rd International Symposium on Functional Medicine. Vancouver, B.C. March 27-31, 1996.
  • The First Annual International Congress on Alternative & Complementary Medicine. Arlington, VA. May 22-25, 1995.
  • Applying New Essentials in Nutritional Medicine. HealthComm, Inc. Chicago, February 1995.
  • Advancement in Clinical Nutrition. HealthComm, Inc. Chicago, February 1994.
  • OSHA'S New Bloodborne Pathogen Standard. Metropolitan Chicago Healthcare Council. Chicago, April 1992.
  • Symposium on Vascular Diagnosis (including advanced workshops).  American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine. San Diego, CA, February 15-21, 1992.
  • Regional Meeting, Scientific Program.  American Rheumatism Association. Chicago, IL. October 1986.
  • Neurology for the Non-Neurologist.  Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center. Chicago, IL. December 1984.
  • Symposium on Non-Invasive Diagnosis of Vascular Disease.  St. John's Mercy Medical Center. St. Louis, MO. March 1981.
  • 2nd Annual Horizon CME Program.  Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine. Maywood, IL 1978.

PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS

  • Wickes DAn interview with Wolfram Laaser.  Distance Learning, 2010; 7(1):41-44.
  • Wickes DVirtual microscopy can replace light microscopy in chiropractic education. Presentation at the World Federation of Chiropractic Educational Conference 2008, “Chiropractic Education in an Era of Digital Natives and Digital Immigrants”. Beijing, China.  November 10-11, 2008.
  • Wickes DModeling blended learning in a faculty development program for a new course management system. Presentation at the World Federation of Chiropractic Educational Conference 2008, “Chiropractic Education in an Era of Digital Natives and Digital Immigrants”. Beijing, China.  November 10-11, 2008.
  • Mrozek JP, Till H, Taylor-Vaisey AL, Wickes DResearch in chiropractic education: an update. J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2006; 29(9):762-73.
  • Wickes DManipulative therapy and functional medicine (Ch. 29).  In Textbook of Functional Medicine.  Institute of Functional Medicine, Gig Harbor, WA.  2006.
  • Mrozek JP, Till H, Taylor-Vaisey AL, Wickes DResearch in Chiropractic Education:  An Update.  Invited White Paper at the Association of Chiropractic College’s 12th Annual Conference, Las Vegas, NV.  March 19, 2005.
  • Wickes DFunctional Medicine’s Approach for Cellular Health.  Invited presentation at the Northwestern College of Chiropractic’s 2004 Homecoming and Winter Gathering; Northwestern Health Sciences University, Bloomington, MN. February 7, 2004.
  • Wickes DMedicare Prescription Drug Benefit – A Healthcare Oxymoron.  Integrative Medicine. 2004; 2(6):10-13.
  • Wickes DEducating Primary Care Chiropractic Physicians. J Chiro Med.  2002; 1(4):175-79.
  • Wickes DComplex Computer-based Patient Simulations for Basic and Clinical Science Instruction.  Invited presentation at the World Federation of Chiropractic international symposium on "Curriculum Development in Chiropractic Education".  Sao Paulo, Brazil.  October 27, 2002.
  • Wickes D. Educating Primary Care Chiropractic Physicians.  Invited presentation at the Primary Care Summit - American Academy of Chiropractic Physicians. Chicago, IL, May 17-18, 2002.
  • Wickes DDiagnosis and Management of Common Arrhythmias.  Invited presentation at the Annual Meeting of the ACA Council on Diagnosis and Internal disorders and the American Academy of Chiropractic Physicians.  New Orleans, LA, July 18-20, 2002.
  • Wickes DPrimary Care Cardiology.  Invited presentation at the Northwest Chiropractic Symposium.  Portland, OR.  May 31, 2002.
  • Wickes D. Primary Care Approach to Hypertension.  Invited presentation for the Florida Chiropractic Physicians Association.  St. Petersberg, FL.  February 22, 2002.
  • Wickes D. Inflammatory Bowel Disorders.  Invited presentation for the Florida Chiropractic Physicians Association.  Orlando, FL.  December 8, 2001.
  • Wickes D. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Invited presentation at “Applying Functional Medicine in Clinical Practice” program. Institute for Functional Medicine. Gig Harbor, Washington. April 5, 2001. (Also presented in October 2000, January 2000 and November 1998).
  • Wickes DPrimary Care of Common Internal Disorders.  Invited presentation.  Albuquerque, NM.  Jan 14-16, 2000.
  • Nichols T (author); Wickes D, Clark M, Costarella L, Lukaczer D, Jordan K (editorial board).  Functional medicine Adjunctive Nutritional Support for Irritable Bowel Syndrome.  Institute for Functional Medicine, Gig Harbor, WA. 1999.
  • Wickes D. Gastrointestinal Function. Invited presentation at “Applying Functional Medicine in Clinical Practice” program. Institute for Functional Medicine, Gig Harbor, WA. March 26, 1999.
  • Wickes, D. Laboratory Evaluation in the Low Back Pain Patient. Chapter 11, in: Cox, J, ed. Low Back Pain: Mechanism, Diagnosis, and Treatment. 6th ed. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins; 1999.
  • Wickes D. Basic Science Assessment using Standardized Patients. Invited presentation at the WFC Conference on the Internationalization of Chiropractic Education, Manila, Philippines. Oct. 1, 1998.
  • Wickes D (grand rounds commentator). Restless Legs Syndrome -Grand Rounds. JNMS Journal of Neuromusculoskeletal System. 1996; 4(3)120-126.
  • Wickes D, Iannelli G, Livingston J. Public and Occupational Health Regulations in Chiropractic Practice. Topics in Clinical Chiropractic. 1994; 1(3):9-19.
  • Wickes D. The Training and Assessment Center and Problem-Based Learning. Invited presentation - American Chiropractic Association Annual Convention, Maui, HI. 1994.
  • Wickes D. Problem-Based Curriculum Development at the National College of Chiropractic. Invited presentation - American Chiropractic Association Annual Convention, Maui, HI. 1994.
  • Wickes D. Cardiovascular Disorders in the Ambulatory Patient. Chapter 10, in: Lawrence, D, ed. Chiropractic Diagnosis and Management. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins, 1991.
  • Wickes, D. Laboratory Evaluation in the Low Back Pain Patient. Chapter 10, in: Cox, J, ed. Low Back Pain: Mechanism, Diagnosis, and Treatment. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins; 1990.
  • Wickes D. Chiropractic Management of Mild Hypertension. Presented at the 13th Annual Meeting of the American Public Health Association, Washington, D.C. Nov. 17-21, 1985.
  • Rebechini-Zazadny H, Heinze W, Tasharski C, Wickes D. The Sequential Effects of Cervical Manipulation on Peripheral Vasomotor and Sudomotor Activity. A Correlation with Electromyography. Proceedings of the 13th Annual Conference on Biomechanics of the Spine, 1982.
  • Rebechini-Zazadny H, Heinze W, Tasharski C, Wickes D. The Effects of Cervical Manipulation on Local and Global Cardiovascular Function: A Correlation with Electromyography. Paper Presented at the 11th Annual Biomechanics Conference, University of Colorado. December 5-6, 1981.
  • Wickes, D. Effects of Thoracolumbar Spinal Manipulation Upon Arterial Flow in the Lower Extremities. JMPT, 1980; 3:3-6. (Funded by Foundation for Chiropractic Education and Research).
  • Wickes, D. Heterozygous Beta Thalassemia: Clinical Review and Case Reports. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics (JMPT) 1979; 2:109-113.

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

  • Member, International Society of Technology in Education (ISTE)
  • Member, American Chiropractic Association (ACA)
  • Member, ACA Council on Diagnosis and Internal Disorders
  • Member, American Public Health Association  (APHA).
  • Member, Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP)
  • Member, Institute of Functional Medicine (IFM)
  • Member, Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE)
  • Member, Center for Academic Integrity
  • Member, Quality Matters (quality assurance for online education)

PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTSHIPS

  • Florida Board of Governors.  Review of proposed doctor of chiropractic degree curriculum at Florida State University.  January 3, 2005.
  • Southern California University of Health Sciences, Los Angeles College of Chiropractic.  Review of Advantage II Curriculum.  September 22-26, 2003. 
  • Universidade Anhembi Morumbi, Sao Paulo, Brazil.  Curriculum Development for a New Brazilian Chiropractic Undergraduate Program.  November 29-December 3, 1999.
  • Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, Toronto, Canada.  External Review - Division of Clinical Education.  May 30-31, 1995
  • Consultant, Commission for the Establishment of Guidelines for Chiropractic Quality Assurance and Standards of Practice. 1993.

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE

  • Chair, Council on Chiropractic Education (2009 to present).
  • Councilor, Council on Chiropractic Education (2009-present)
  • Chair, Commission on Accreditation of the Council on Chiropractic Education (2009).
  • Vice-Chairperson, Commission on Accreditation of the Council on Chiropractic Education (2007 to 2008).
  • Commissioner, Commission on Accreditation of the Council on Chiropractic Education (2006 to 2009).
  • Member, Peer review committee.  Association of Chiropractic Colleges Annual Educational Conference.  2004 to 2006.
  • Reviewer, Association of Chiropractic Colleges’ Research Scholarship Program.  2003-2004
  • Member, Board of Directors, Council on Chiropractic Education (1999-2004).  Also served as Secretary for the CCE Board of Directors, 2003-2004.
  • Site Team Evaluator, Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities.  Participated in regional accreditation evaluation teams.  2008 to present.
  • Member, Academy of Site Team Visitors (Accreditation Site Visitation Team Members), Council on Chiropractic Education. 1997 to present.  Participated in multiple full and focused accreditation site team visitations.
  • Site team member, Council on Naturopathic Medical Education, 2004 to present. The CNME is the U.S. Office of Education’s specialized accrediting agency for naturopathic medical education.
  • Coordinator, Site Team Member Training Workshop; Commission on Accreditation of the Council on Chiropractic Education.  March 10, 2004, Las Vegas, NV.
  • Associate Editor, Integrative Medicine: A Clinician's Journal.  2002 to present.
  • Associate Editor, Journal of the Neuromusculoskeletal System (JNMS).  1994-2003.
  • Research Editor, The Chiropractic Internist.  1995 to present
  • Associate Editor, Journal of Chiropractic Education.  1991-1998.
  • Test Committee Member, General Diagnosis. National Board of Chiropractic Examiners. 1993-1996.

OTHER ACHIEVEMENTS

  • Participant in the National Security Seminar at the U.S. Army War College June 5-9, 2006.  Only 160 civilian attendees are selected from over 2700 nominations.  Curriculum focuses on strategic perspectives and senior-level leadership.
  • Professor Emeritus, National University of Health Sciences.  Appointed 2004.
  • Outstanding Alumnus of Year (1997), National College of Chiropractic Alumni Association.
  • Fellow of the International College of Chiropractors (FICC). Elected 1996.
  • Board Certified (D.A.B.C.I) - American Board of Chiropractic Internists.  1991.